HOLIDAY TURKEY FACTS (WE BET YOU DIDN'T KNOW)

Did you know? 

  • As far back as 1000 A.D., Native American Indians raised turkeys for food. Aztec Indians in Mexico were raising them as early as 200 B.C.

  • Turkeys originally existed in the eastern US. and Mexico.

  • Turkeys are actually a type of pheasant.

  • The heaviest turkey weighed in at 86 pounds. Please pass the stuffing!

  • Turkeys have excellent and a wide range of vision, about 270 degrees.

  • Mature turkeys have about 3,500 feathers. I wonder who took the time to count them?

  • The turkey industry grosses over $1billion a year.

  • The Average American consumes over 15 pounds of Turkey per year.

  • Americans will cook over 45 million turkeys on Christmas Day.

  • 235 million turkeys were raised in 2014. The record is 302.7 million in 1996.

  • Over 770 million pounds of cranberries are consumed on Thanksgiving.

  • Turkey, like poultry, is lower in cholesterol than beef an many other meats. The dark meat (thigh, legs,) contains more fat and cholesterol than white meat. So, that's why dark meat tastes so good!

  • Male Turkeys are called "Toms" or "Gobblers", female turkeys are called "Hens" and baby turkeys are called "poults".

  • How's that taste? Old Toms are better tasting then young toms. Conversely, young hens taste better than old hens.

  • In 2016, there was over 100,000 phone calls to the Butterball Turkey Talk Line. The average call time was 3 munites, and 8 seconds.

  • Only Tom turkeys "gobble".

  • That long, loose skin that hangs down from a turkey's neck is called a "wattle".

  • Turkey eggs are tan in color and speckled with brown. They are about twice as large as chicken eggs.

  • Wild turkeys can fly 55 miles per hour, and run 25 miles per hour.

  • In 1947, the first Presidential pardon was ceremoniously given to a turkey.

  • The  "Turkey Trot" was named after how turkeys walk.... in short, jerky steps.

  • Sleepy after the big meal? Turkey contains an amino acid called "Tryptophan". Tryptophan sets off a chemical chain reaction that calms you down and makes you sleepy.

  • The Native American name for turkey is "Firkee"

  • You can tell the sex of a turkey from their poop. Males form a spiral on the ground, while females leave "J" shaped poop. I'm sure you wanted to know this.

  • Mature turkeys have over 3,500 feathers.

  • Native Americans considered turkeys to be weak. As a result, they would only eat them when food was scarce, or in times of famine.

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CHEAT SHEET FOR CKL BUSINESSES IN THE SECOND SHUTDOWN - WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW TODAY.

All businesses in the CKL are subject to these general rules or guidelines during the provincial shutdown, beginning December 26:

  • All businesses open must prepare, post and make available a COVID Safety Plan. A sample plan is available here: https://www.ontario.ca/page/develop-your-covid-19-workplace-safety-plan

  • All businesses or facilities that engage in retail sales to the public must post a sign in a location visible to the public that states the maximum capacity they are permitted to operate under

  • Businesses must ensure that masks or face coverings are worn by any person in the indoor area of the business or organization, with limited exceptions.

  • Workplaces must screen any workers or essential visitors entering the work environment. Get the Screening Tool for Workplaces here: http://www.health.gov.on.ca/en/pro/programs/publichealth/coronavirus/docs/workplace_screening_tool_guidance.pdf

  • Businesses or places must not permit patrons to line up inside the businesses or place, or to line up or congregate outside of the business or place unless they are maintaining a physical distance of at least two meters from other groups of persons and wearing a mask or face covering that covers their mouth, nose and chin unless they are entitled to an exception set out in the regulation.

  • PPE that provides protection of the eyes, nose, and mouth is required if a worker is required to come within 2 meters of another person who is not wearing a face covering and not separated by plexiglass or some other impermeable barrier.

  • All businesses or facilities must limit capacity so that every member of the public is able to maintain two meters of physical distancing from every other person, and limit the number of people occupying any room that is open to the public to 50% capacity of the particular room. Some businesses or facilities have additional capacity restrictions that apply beyond the general capacity requirements.

  • Businesses shall ensure that equipment, washrooms, locker rooms, change rooms, showers that are accessible to the public are cleaned and disinfected as frequently as is necessary to maintain a sanitary condition

A full summary of the new shutdown measures is available here, including sector-specific rules and guidelines:

https://embed.documentcloud.org/documents/20433181-provincewide-shutdown-deck-december-21-2020-final/?embed=1&fbclid=IwAR1MoouD9hTBqtFS4euVppAiKWjzTH-6La6wN4Xzm4ePOKfhgrGzx4Nq8C0

 

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NEW BUSINESS SUPPORT GRANT ($10,000-$20,000) NOW AVAILABLE TO ELIGIBLE CKL BUSINESSES DURING THE SECOND SHUTDOWN

During the second lockdown beginning December 26, the Ontario Small Business Support Grant will provide a minimum of $10,000 and up to $20,000 to eligible small businesses required to close or restrict services.

Eligible small businesses include those that:

  • are required to close or significantly restrict services subject to the shutdown effective 12:01 a.m. on December 26, 2020;
  • have less than 100 employees at the enterprise level; and
  • have experienced a minimum of 20 per cent revenue decline in April 2020 compared to April 2019

Essential businesses that are allowed to remain open will not be eligible for this grant.

Further details, including how to apply, will be announced in January 2021.

 

More information is available here:  https://news.ontario.ca/en/backgrounder/59788/post-4
 
Businesses that are impacted by the provincial shutdown will also be eligible for the property tax and energy cost rebates.

Business can apply for the Rebates at www.ontario.ca/smallbusiness

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NEW, FLAT-RATE TAX DEDUCTION FOR WORKING-FROM-HOME EMPLOYEES IN THE CKL

The CRA has announced a new policy for employees and their ability to deduct home office expenses for the 2020 taxation year.

The policy is temporary and made in order to accommodate employees who were required to work from home due to the COVID-19 pandemic during the 2020 tax year.

Employees who were required to work from home at least 50% of the time for at least four consecutive weeks during 2020 due to the pandemic may use the new “simplified process”.

Under that process, employees do not need to calculate the size of their workspace, keep detailed supporting documents, or have their employer sign a Form T2200 (as would normally be required in order to claim home office expenses).

This flat rate method is only available for 2020.

Employees eligible to use the simplified process can deduct $2 for each day they worked at home during 2020 due to COVID-19, up to a maximum of $400 (i.e. 200 working days).

Vacation days or other leave days are not eligible for this deduction. Employees choosing to use the simplified process cannot claim any other type of employment expenses for the 2020 tax year. Employees claiming the flat rate deduction should complete Option 1 of new Form T777S.

Alternatively, employees who wish to deduct their actual home office expenses in 2020 can continue to use the detailed method from prior taxation years.

The CRA has created simplified forms (T2200S and T777S) and an online calculator to assist employees in that process.

Here is the announcement:

https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/tax/individuals/topics/about-your-tax-return/tax-return/completing-a-tax-return/deductions-credits-expenses/line-229-other-employment-expenses/work-space-home-expenses/what-changes.html

Here is the calculator:

https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/tax/individuals/topics/about-your-tax-return/tax-return/completing-a-tax-return/deductions-credits-expenses/line-229-other-employment-expenses/work-space-home-expenses/calculate-expenses.html

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$25,000 TO EMPLOYEE FIRED AFTER RAISING COVID-19 SAFETY CONCERNS

A farmhand complained to his employer about the safety conditions at the farm, or workplace.

He did so shortly after a COVID outbreak at the farm, including the death of a co-worker related to the outbreak.

After raising these concerns, the employer told the farmhand that he would be shipped back to Mexico and bought him a plane ticket.

The employee ultimately stayed in Ontario, believing he had been fired.

Several months afterwards, the employer offered a return to work to the farmhand, but he refused.

The worker filed a complaint with the Ontario Labour Relations Board alleging he was fired for raising safety concerns. The employer said that the worker resigned, and he had exercised no protected rights under health and safety legislation.

The Board decided the worker was fired because he raised health and safety concerns. This was because the worker was fired the day after he raised the health and safety concerns and during a confrontation about the worker allegedly talking to the media.

The Board concluded that the farm had engaged in a prohibited reprisal under health and safety legislation. The Board said this reprisal was more serious because of the power imbalance between the farm and the seasonal worker. The worker did not speak English and relied on the farm for wages, shelter, and transportation. The Board ordered the farm to pay the worker more than $25,000 in damages for lost wages, loss of future earnings, and pain and suffering among other things.

The Board did not reduce the damages because the worker refused to accept re-employment. The Board said it was reasonable for the worker to refuse without assurances that the employer would correct issues or some proof that it had already done so.

What does this mean for employers? Health and safety concerns raised by workers about COVID-19 should be taken seriously, investigated, and, if necessary, remedial action taken to control the hazard.

This also reminds employers that workers cannot generally be threatened with or subject to a reprisal for the bona fide exercise of rights under health and safety legislation.

Workers can still be disciplined for misconduct unrelated to the bona fide exercise of health and safety rights under legislation. Where this misconduct occurs around the same time as an exercise of safety rights, employers should seek legal advice to ensure they do not inadvertently violate the reprisal protection of health and safety legislation. There is a reverse onus in a reprisal case. It is the employer's burden to prove that a reprisal did not occur. This can be challenging in any case. It is particularly difficult in a case like this where there was conflicting testimony from witnesses, some of whom speak different languages, and little or no documentary evidence.

The Case:

Flores v Scotlynn Sweetpac Growers Inc., 2020 CanLII 88341 (ON LRB).

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OUR FUN, ANNUAL CHRISTMAS TIPS FOR A LAWFUL AND LEGALLY-COMPLIANT HOLIDAY

It will be here before you know it. Our (non-exhaustive) tips to you and your family for a safe, fun and legally-prudent Christmas Day for 2020:

1)       On Christmas Eve after early bed time, apply a liberal, but discreet, thin layer of baby powder on the floor outside each child’s room to discourage middle-of-the-night stocking snooping;

2)       When you retire on Christmas Eve to wait for Santa, fasten green painter’s tape plentifully between the newel posts at the top of the stairs to further discourage over-enthusiastic stocking visitation before Mom and Dad are up, dressed, coffeed-up and ready to go (enough to ensure a child cannot pass through the tape wall without sound and extensive effort);

3)       Turn over the toy gift and actually untie/unravel all of those annoying twist-ties holding your child’s toy in its excessive plastic packaging – don’t try to jam scissors or a sharp knife in to that tight space to try to cut the ties where they wrap around the toy itself; 

4)       Prevent your child (and husband/father) from testing the 9 volt battery for the new toy by pressing it on their tongue – this has actually caused injury and emergency room visits;

5)       Take out all of the pins from your new shirt before trying it on; 

6)       Avoid conveniently grabbing the sharp knife from the kitchen to cut open the hard plastic packaging for that toy – take the time to find and use the correct tool, like scissors or a utility knife with a guard;

7)       Pick up the broken pieces of the hard plastic wrapping from the floor after the gift unwrap – avoid the pieces getting lodged in a barefooted, housecoat-wearing, messy-haired family member;

8)       Read the Pot of Gold chocolate index before selecting – there are reported cases of severe allergic reaction caused by mistakenly believing your choice was the cherry-filled (i.e., avoid the marzipan one);

9)       Don’t carve the turkey after consuming three (3) alcohol drinks or more;

10)     Leave adequate space between you/your children and the Christmas tree branches when retrieving gifts under the tree – eye lacerations are a common Christmas morning accident;

11)     Remind your elderly family members at the Christmas dinner to chew their meat thoroughly – most Christmas mishaps often involve choking at X-Mas dinner;

12)     Ensure the zipper is drawn down before your enthusiastic child tries on that new jumper, coat or hoodie – a common source of eye injury on the holiest of mornings; and

13)     Pull the knife across the avocado and twist it (to remove the stone), rather than stabbing down and prying it out – there are recorded emergency room visits about this. 

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VACCINATION FOR KIDS AND SEPARATED PARENTS - WHO DECIDES? DO THE REST OF US HAVE A SAY?

Vaccines are reportedly on the way.

So, what happens if there is conflict between separated parents about whether a child should be vaccinated?

Who decides?

What about the public health priority?

“Two recent decisions provide a helpful hint as to how our courts might approach disputes between parents about whether their children should be vaccinated.

In Tarkowski v. Lemieux [2020] O.J. No. 2627, both parents argued at trial for sole custody of their 6-year-old daughter. The court ultimately granted custody to the mother with the proviso that the father would have custody over all vaccination-related decisions.

Justice Penny Jones noted evidence that the mother had a checkered history regarding her child’s vaccinations, including a belief that vaccines might be linked to autism or immune system problems.

The court granted the father decision-making power with respect to vaccinations after considering the prevalence and impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Notably, this decision-making power included the authority to vaccinate the child with a future COVID-19 vaccine.

The court approached this issue with an eye towards the greater public’s health in addition to the child’s health. As Justice Jones stated at para. 74, “Since children and young people often show little or no reaction to the virus, a decision to vaccinate a child may be informed by a public health concern that COVID-19 is a virus that is easily spread and which disproportionately harms older people, and people with challenged immune systems. Ultimately, a decision to vaccinate [the child] may be a decision to protect other vulnerable people against [the child] spreading the disease.”

In another decision, B.C.J.B. v. E.R.R. [2020] O.J. No. 4273, the court heard a motion that addressed a father’s request to be granted decision-making authority over having their child vaccinated.

At the heart of the dispute was determination of the applicable test for transferring decision-making authority over vaccinations from one parent to the other, prior to a trial of the issue. The father argued that the test was the “best interests of the child,” while the mother, who had sole custody of the child pursuant to an early parenting agreement, argued that in order to change the status quo, the father needed to establish “exigent circumstances.”

The court ultimately held that since this was not a variation case, the focus ought to be on the best interests of the child. The crux of the father’s argument in support of vaccinating the parties’ son was that the child, who had not been vaccinated in accordance with the standard Ontario vaccinations for children of his age, was at an elevated level of risk due to the pandemic, and the best interests of the child therefore necessitated a ruling pretrial.

The motion judge, Justice Alex Finlayson, ruled in favour of the father, stating at paragraph 124, “I find the child is already exposed to risk by not being vaccinated as it is. It is not an answer to argue that the child has not contracted a disease during the last 10 years, so what’s the harm in waiting a few more months to trial. This, in effect, is what the mother argues. If it is in the child’s best interests to act now, then the Court should intervene.”

The motion judge very deliberately stated that the father’s pretrial vaccine powers did not extend to a COVID-19 vaccine, which would need to be addressed at trial.

A takeaway for counsel from these cases is that once a COVID-19 vaccine is released, the best interests of the child will most likely determine whether a child should be vaccinated, irrespective of the de facto custodial parent’s personal views on vaccinations.

It remains to be seen how the court will balance consideration of a child’s best interests with broader public health interests and the prevalence of anti-vaccination beliefs, but these two cases point in the direction of a likely wider judicial affirmation of the necessity of COVID-19 vaccination for children, even where one parent objects.”

Credit:

Garry J. Wise, Simran Bakshi and Joshua Prizant, Wise Law Office, via Lexology.com, Dec. 9, 2020

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CHRISTMAS BONUSES AND HOLIDAY GIFTS BY EMPLOYERS – ENROLLMENT IN THE ‘JELLY-OF-THE-MONTH’ CLUB THIS YEAR? READ THIS BEFORE KIDNAPPING YOUR BOSS ON CHRISTMAS EVE

Holiday bonuses (and gifts) are commonly appreciated, morale-boosting and an opportunity for employers to express gratitude to employees collectively at the end of the work year.

However, if expectations are not met, they can also cause strife, conflict and, in some cases, litigation. 

Bonuses are not legislatively governed in Ontario; rather, they are considered a contractual matter between employers and employees. There is no legal requirement for an employer to pay a holiday bonus, unless contractually required to do so. However, if a bonus paid to an employee on a year-over-year basis evolves into part of that employee’s overall compensation, the employer may by law be required to pay it the employee in future, including during a reasonable notice period following a termination without cause.  Employers may also adopt a workplace policy regarding bonuses, which typically govern availability, amount and other criteria. 

Generally, if employers pay a holiday bonus, or an amount beyond employees’ regular pay, it is either:  

  1. a fixed, recurring holiday bonus annually, usually of a fixed amount, not typically based on work performance or the financial success of the employer’s business;
  2. a pre-determined bonus amount, usually based on either, or both, the employee’s and the business’ performance, often based on set criteria pursuant to a workplace policy; or   
  3. a purely discretionary bonus, decided by the employer each year.

If an employer pays a holiday bonus historically, but changes its mind this year, like Mr. Shirley, an employee’s employment contract should be considered. If the holiday bonus is an important term, the employee may legally be entitled to the bonus. If there is no employment contract, the holiday bonus may have formed a part of the employee’s annual compensation, giving the employee a potential claim to the holiday bonus.

Before employers change their holiday bonus policy or traditional practice, they should review their employment contracts and workplace policies and, if they do not require payment of the holiday bonus, notify employees in advance of the decision to pay no, or a significantly less, holiday bonus. How much notice should be given will likely vary between employees, depending on their duration of employment, nature of their position and even age. 

If an employee is terminated without cause, the employee may be able to successfully claim payment of a holiday bonus as part of the wrongful termination damages. It will depend on the terms of the employee’s employment contract and, if none, whether the bonus would be considered a recurring part of the employee’s annual compensation. If the holiday bonus has been purely discretionary by the employer, it is likely the employee’s claim would not be successful. 

Generally, in Ontario employment law, if an employer gives an employee a holiday gift (not a payment of money), it is considered by the Court to be discretionary, gratuitous and not binding on the employer in future.

However, a workplace governed by a collective bargaining agreement may be different. In a recent case in Quebec, an arbitrator dismissed a grievance of the employer’s unilateral decision to stop giving employees a $50 gift card at Christmas. It was considered a discretionary decision in this case, based on the specific language of the collective bargaining agreement. However, a different outcome may have been reached for different collective bargaining terms. 

For example, other arbitral decisions in Quebec have held that Christmas gifts by employers were determined to be conditions of employment and, therefore, protected by the ‘vested-rights’ clauses in those collective bargaining agreements. Employers that unilaterally stopped these holiday gifts faced a costly and unfavourable grievance process.

Therefore, if you get a “Jelly-of-the-Month Club” card this year, like Clark W. Griswold, when you were expecting much more based on years past, you may have a claim against your employer, but it will depend on your employment contract, if any, past practices by the employer, and whether your historically-received holiday bonus was recurring, not governed by any workplace policy and not nominal in value.

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WELCOME TO YELLOW - WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW TODAY

Here’s what Yellow looks like and means:

Organized public events, social gatherings and religious services, rites and ceremonies

  • Limits for functions, parties, dinners, gatherings, barbeques or wedding receptions held in private residences, backyards, or parks:

    • 10 people indoors

    • 25 people outdoors

  • Limits for organized public events and gatherings in staffed businesses and facilities:

    • 50 people indoors

    • 100 people outdoors

  • Limits for religious services rites or ceremonies, including wedding services and funeral services (apply regardless of the venue where held):

    • 30% capacity of the room indoors

    • 100 people outdoors

Restaurants, bars and other food and drink establishments

  • Require patrons to be seated; 2 metre minimum or impermeable barrier required between tables

  • Limit of 6 people may be seated together

  • Dancing, singing and performing music is permitted, with restrictions

  • Karaoke permitted, with restrictions (including no private rooms)

  • Require patron contact information for all seated patrons

  • No buffet style service

  • Line-ups and patrons congregating outside venues managed by venue; 2 metres distance and face covering required

  • Face coverings required except when eating or drinking only

  • Personal protective equipment, including eye protection, required when a worker must come within 2 metres of another person who is not wearing a face covering

  • Night clubs only permitted to operate as restaurant or bar

  • Establishments must be closed from 12 a.m. to 5 a.m.

  • Liquor sold or served only between 9 a.m. to 11 p.m.

  • No consumption of liquor permitted between 12 a.m. to 9 a.m.

  • Limit volume of music to be low enough that a normal conversation is possible

  • safety plan is required to be prepared and made available upon request

Sports and recreational fitness facilities

  • Maintain 2 metre physical distancing, unless engaged in a sport

  • Capacity limits:

    • 10 people indoors per room or 25 people outdoors in classes

    • 50 people indoors in areas with weights or exercise equipment

  • Maximum of 50 spectators indoors or and 100 outdoors

  • Capacity limits apply on a per-room basis if operating in compliance with a plan approved by the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health (Guidance for Facilities for Sport and Recreational Fitness Activities During COVID-19)

  • Team or individual sports must be modified to avoid physical contact with an exemption for high performance athletes, including parasport athletes, and professional leagues; maximum 50 people per league

  • Limit volume of music to be low enough that a normal conversation is possible; measures to prevent shouting by both instructors and members of the public

  • Face coverings required except when exercising

  • Increase spacing between patrons to 3 metres for areas of a sport or recreational facility where there are weights or exercise equipment and in exercise and fitness classes

  • Require contact information for all members of the public that enter the facility

  • Require reservation for entry; one reservation for teams

  • safety plan is required to the prepared and made available upon request

Meeting and event spaces

  • Capacity limits:

    • 50 people indoors

    • 100 people outdoors

    • exception for court and government services

    • religious services, rites or ceremonies, including wedding services and funeral services:

      •  30% capacity of the room indoors

      • 100 people outdoors

  • Booking multiple rooms for the same event not permitted

  • Maximum of 50 people per room indoors, where physical distancing can be maintained if venue operates in accordance with the approved plan from the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health (Guidance for Meeting and Event Facilities During COVID-19)

  • Establishments must be closed from 12 a.m. to 5 a.m.

  • Liquor sold or served only between 9 a.m. to 11 p.m.

  • No consumption of liquor permitted between 12 a.m. to 9 a.m.

  • Require contact information for all seated patrons

  • Limit of 6 people may be seated together

  • Limit volume of music to be low enough that a normal conversation is possible

  • safety plan is required to be prepared and made available upon request

Retail

  • Fitting rooms must be limited to non-adjacent stalls

  • Line-ups and patrons congregating outside venues managed by venue; 2 metre distance and face covering required

  • Limit volume of music to be low enough that a normal conversation is possible

  • For malls, a safety plan is required to be prepared and made available upon request

Personal care services

  • Oxygen bars, steam rooms and saunas closed

  • Require contact information from all patrons

  • safety plan is required to be prepared and made available upon request

Casinos, bingo halls and gaming establishments

  • Maximum of 50 people

  • Table games are prohibited

  • Casinos, bingo halls and gaming establishments can operate in accordance with a plan approved by the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health

  • Liquor sold or served only between 9 a.m. to 11 p.m.

  • No consumption of liquor permitted between 12 a.m. to 9 a.m.

  • Require contact information from all patrons

  • safety plan is required to be prepared and made available upon request

Cinemas

  • Maximum of 50 people indoors or 100 outdoors

  • 50 people indoors per indoor auditorium if cinema operates in accordance with the approved plan from the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health (Guidance for Movie Theatres During COVID-19)

  • Face coverings except when eating or drinking only

  • Drive-in cinemas permitted to operate, subject to restrictions

  • Liquor sold or served only between 9 a.m. to 11 p.m.

  • No consumption of liquor permitted between 12 a.m. to 9 a.m.

  • Require contact information from all patrons

  • safety plan is required to be prepared and made available upon request

Performing arts facilities

  • Maximum of 50 spectators indoors and 100 spectators outdoors

  • Singers and players of wind or brass instruments must be separated from spectators by plexiglass or some other impermeable barrier

  • Rehearsal or performing a recorded or broadcasted event permitted

  • Performers and employees must maintain 2 metre physical distance except for purposes of the performance

  • Drive-in performances permitted

  • Liquor sold or served only between 9 a.m. to 11 p.m.

  • No consumption of liquor permitted between 12 a.m. to 9 a.m.

  • Require contact information from all patrons

  • safety plan is required to be prepared and made available upon request

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CHRISTMAS TREE SAFETY TIPS

Both real and fake Christmas trees can conflagrate in mere seconds, filling the room with smoke and fire that can spread relentlessly through your entire home.

Sorry, we don’t mean to be The Grinch, but many festive families do not give enough attention to these incendiary homages.

The record is rife with terrible stories about avoidable injury and damage. Even your alarms may not give enough advance warning to keep pace with the agility and speed of the flames.  

 This holiday season, consider taking these steps, if you do not already:

•    Look for a tree with vibrant green needles that are hard to pluck and don't break easily from its branches. The tree shouldn't be shedding its needles readily
•    Always place your tree away from heat sources like fireplaces, radiators, candles, heat vents or lights and keep the tree base filled with water to avoid a dry out
•    Double check your home alarms have fresh batteries and are working properly
•    Make sure all your indoor and outdoor Christmas lights are ESA approved (it should say on the box) and discard/recycle any damaged lights or bulbs
•    Any lights you use outdoors must be labeled suitable for exterior placement and be sure to plug into a ground-fault circuit interrupter protected receptacle
•    Keep all your holiday candles away from your Christmas tree, surrounding furniture and décor
•    Bedtime means lights off - don't forget to turn your Christmas tree light switch each night and, if you use an automated timer, double-check that it is working properly
•    When your tree begins to drop its needles profusely, it's time to say goodbye to your evergreen foliage until next year, even if your holidaying is not quite finished yet
•    If you buy a pre-cut tree, consider sawing off an inch or two from the stump of the tree so water can be easily absorbed

Happy holidays, from the GrinchWards!

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CKL IN THE YELLOW ZONE - SAFETY PLAN NOW REQUIRED FOR MANY BUSINESSES - GET YOUR SAMPLE SAFETY PLAN HERE.

The CKL is moving to Yellow Zone as of 12:01 a.m. on Monday, December 7. 

Certain businesses in the CKL are now required to have a COVID Safety Plan, which must be available upon request. 

These businesses are identified below. 

Here is a link to a sample COVID-19 Safety Plan: 

https://www.hkpr.on.ca/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/COVID-Safety-Planning-Tool-HKPR.pdf

Restaurants, bars and other food and drink establishments

  • Require patrons to be seated; 2 metre minimum or impermeable barrier required between tables

  • Limit of 6 people may be seated together

  • Dancing, singing and performing music is permitted, with restrictions

  • Karaoke permitted, with restrictions (including no private rooms)

  • Require patron contact information for all seated patrons

  • No buffet style service

  • Line-ups and patrons congregating outside venues managed by venue; 2 metres distance and face covering required

  • Face coverings required except when eating or drinking only

  • Personal protective equipment, including eye protection, required when a worker must come within 2 metres of another person who is not wearing a face covering

  • Night clubs only permitted to operate as restaurant or bar

  • Establishments must be closed from 12 a.m. to 5 a.m.

  • Liquor sold or served only between 9 a.m. to 11 p.m.

  • No consumption of liquor permitted between 12 a.m. to 9 a.m.

  • Limit volume of music to be low enough that a normal conversation is possible

  • safety plan is required to be prepared and made available upon request

Sports and recreational fitness facilities

  • Maintain 2 metre physical distancing, unless engaged in a sport

  • Capacity limits:

    • 10 people indoors per room or 25 people outdoors in classes

    • 50 people indoors in areas with weights or exercise equipment

  • Maximum of 50 spectators indoors or and 100 outdoors

  • Capacity limits apply on a per-room basis if operating in compliance with a plan approved by the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health (Guidance for Facilities for Sport and Recreational Fitness Activities During COVID-19)

  • Team or individual sports must be modified to avoid physical contact with an exemption for high performance athletes, including parasport athletes, and professional leagues; maximum 50 people per league

  • Limit volume of music to be low enough that a normal conversation is possible; measures to prevent shouting by both instructors and members of the public

  • Face coverings required except when exercising

  • Increase spacing between patrons to 3 metres for areas of a sport or recreational facility where there are weights or exercise equipment and in exercise and fitness classes

  • Require contact information for all members of the public that enter the facility

  • Require reservation for entry; one reservation for teams

  • safety plan is required to the prepared and made available upon request

Meeting and event spaces

  • Capacity limits:

    • 50 people indoors

    • 100 people outdoors

    • exception for court and government services

    • religious services, rites or ceremonies, including wedding services and funeral services:

      •  30% capacity of the room indoors

      • 100 people outdoors

  • Booking multiple rooms for the same event not permitted

  • Maximum of 50 people per room indoors, where physical distancing can be maintained if venue operates in accordance with the approved plan from the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health (Guidance for Meeting and Event Facilities During COVID-19)

  • Establishments must be closed from 12 a.m. to 5 a.m.

  • Liquor sold or served only between 9 a.m. to 11 p.m.

  • No consumption of liquor permitted between 12 a.m. to 9 a.m.

  • Require contact information for all seated patrons

  • Limit of 6 people may be seated together

  • Limit volume of music to be low enough that a normal conversation is possible

  • safety plan is required to be prepared and made available upon request

Retail

  • Fitting rooms must be limited to non-adjacent stalls

  • Line-ups and patrons congregating outside venues managed by venue; 2 metre distance and face covering required

  • Limit volume of music to be low enough that a normal conversation is possible

  • For malls, a safety plan is required to be prepared and made available upon request

Personal care services

  • Oxygen bars, steam rooms and saunas closed

  • Require contact information from all patrons

  • safety plan is required to be prepared and made available upon request

Casinos, bingo halls and gaming establishments

  • Maximum of 50 people

  • Table games are prohibited

  • Casinos, bingo halls and gaming establishments can operate in accordance with a plan approved by the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health

  • Liquor sold or served only between 9 a.m. to 11 p.m.

  • No consumption of liquor permitted between 12 a.m. to 9 a.m.

  • Require contact information from all patrons

  • safety plan is required to be prepared and made available upon request

Cinemas

  • Maximum of 50 people indoors or 100 outdoors

  • 50 people indoors per indoor auditorium if cinema operates in accordance with the approved plan from the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health (Guidance for Movie Theatres During COVID-19)

  • Face coverings except when eating or drinking only

  • Drive-in cinemas permitted to operate, subject to restrictions

  • Liquor sold or served only between 9 a.m. to 11 p.m.

  • No consumption of liquor permitted between 12 a.m. to 9 a.m.

  • Require contact information from all patrons

  • safety plan is required to be prepared and made available upon request

Performing arts facilities

  • Maximum of 50 spectators indoors and 100 spectators outdoors

  • Singers and players of wind or brass instruments must be separated from spectators by plexiglass or some other impermeable barrier

  • Rehearsal or performing a recorded or broadcasted event permitted

  • Performers and employees must maintain 2 metre physical distance except for purposes of the performance

  • Drive-in performances permitted

  • Liquor sold or served only between 9 a.m. to 11 p.m.

  • No consumption of liquor permitted between 12 a.m. to 9 a.m.

  • Require contact information from all patrons

  • safety plan is required to be prepared and made available upon request

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